Zoom Schedule

Day One: Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Asia/Australia Focus 1
Time: 00:45 – 05:00 UTC

Welcome / Keynote 1 / Special Presentation

Jim Wilkinson, President, IUT (Harvard University)

1:00-2:00  Keynote 1: Embedding Positive Education in University Teaching  

Deborah Hall (Heriot-Watt University Malaysia, Malaysia)

Contemporary debate proposes that adolescent growth extends to age 24. This in turn extends the window of opportunity for skills development, especially in cooperative activities that require emotional awareness and regulation.

Research has shown that enhancing students’ strengths in positive emotion, engagement, and meaning in life promotes a growth mindset, facilitates improved learning, increases life satisfaction and counteracts the risk of poor mental health. Therefore, the goal of positive education is to improve students’ well-being and learning.

Two thirds of the world’s population lives in Asia, yet most of the academic literature on positive education is conducted in Western countries. Moreover, while there are numerous examples of positive education in schools, the discipline has made fewer inroads in the higher education setting.

This presentation maps out the literature on positive education in university teaching, seen through an Asian lens. Key points will be drawn on illustrative evidence from a compulsory positive education course for all first-year students enrolled at Heriot-Watt University Malaysia. Course design and educator style incorporate the principles of positive psychology by blending development in personal effectiveness skills (such as self-confidence, self-reflection, personal responsibility, leadership, and time management) with an emphasis on developing self-awareness, discovering purpose, and creating a plan to mobilize that purpose into positive impact.

Keynote 1 Discussion

Break

3:30  Engaging with Educational Research: Five Ideas from the Literature to Improve Student-Faculty Collaboration

Anne Margaret Tierney (Heriot-Watt University, Scotland, UK)

Canceled: Digital Showcase 1:  LEAN and Edutainment in Orthodontics Revisited

Shazia Naser-ud-Din (Charles Sturt University, Australia), Mark Robinson (University of St. Andrews, UK)

Discussion

Conference Opening Asia / Australia / India / New Zealand

Time: 0:45 UTC – 5:00 UTC

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Day One: Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 1
Time: 07:45 – 09:30 UTC

Welcome / Keynote 2

07:45 Welcome and Opening Remarks:

Jim Wilkinson, President, IUT (Harvard University, USA)

8:00 UTC  Keynote 2: Using Systemic Interventions to Humanize the Classroom

Irene Nikandrou & Leda Panayotopoulou (Athens University of Economics and Business, Greece),

Janina Tosic (Ruhr West University of Applied Sciences, Germany)

Teaching is more than conveying content. Our role is to create a safe learning environment that facilitates interactions between participants and to incorporate emerging issues into our design. As educators, we need to take into account the broader socio-economic context as well as the intra- and interpersonal experiences of our students. We need to facilitate learning experiences that allow our students to develop holistically as human beings. In this keynote session you will experience the power of systemic interventions and we will discuss goals and outcomes of these exercises. You will leave the keynote with concrete ideas for your own courses and learn more about how systemic interventions shape individuals, relationships, and the general atmosphere in the classroom.

Keynote 2 Discussion

Break

Conference Opening Europe / Middle East / Africa

Time: 7:45 UTC – 9:30 UTC

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Day One: Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 2
Time: 10:00 – 15:00 UTC

Papers 1 / Workshop 1 / Roundtable 1

10:00  A Prerequisite for Sustainable Educational Development in Nigeria

Nwameze Owhoeke (Federal College of Education, Omoku, Nigeria)

This study explores the potential role of cultural education as a prerequisite for sustainable western education development in Nigeria. It is a narrative textual case study (NTCS)—that is, all materials were sourced through secondary data. The paper discusses in detail the concept, value, importance, overall impact, and the contributions of cultural education to the development of western education in Nigeria. The paper concludes with the recommendation that cultural education should form part of the educational curriculum in Nigerian institutions of learning.

10:20  Feelings about Feedback: Who Cares about What?

Elizabeth Black & Kara Makara Fuller (University of Glasgow, UK)

What do learners and teachers care about most when it comes to feedback? If feedback is a dialogue, are we talking at cross-purposes? This paper draws on findings from a research project exploring practical solutions to enduring concerns around the provision of feedback in a School of Education within a large research-intensive university. Data from focus groups with students and interviews with teachers supports insights into the understandings and priorities of these different groups of feedback “senders” and “receivers” to answer the question: What features of consistent feedback support effective assessment for learning?

10:40  Developing Growth Mindsets

Anita Campbell (University of Cape Town, South Africa)

Given the wide-ranging benefits of growth mindsets, enthusiastic educators and researchers have tried to instill growth mindsets in students at all levels of study. However, interventions to develop growth mindsets have produced mixed results. I explore some reasons for the mixed results from growth mindset intervention studies through a summary of experiences that promote growth mindsets and a comparison with interview data from first-year engineering students at a South African university who were assessed as having strong growth mindsets. Limitations with assessing mindsets through scales and interviews will be discussed, as well as suggestions for developing growth mindset environments.

11:00  The Human Side of Teaching

Nitza Davidovitch & Ruth Dorot (Ariel University, Israel)

The COVID-19 pandemic forced academic institutions in Israel, as well as those across the world, to instantaneously adopt online learning. In this paper we will present the findings of a study on academic lecturers’ opinions concerning various aspects of the advantages and shortcomings of online learning, adopting a systemic, multi-institutional perspective. Participants in the study were 223 lecturers in universities, teaching colleges, engineering colleges, and private colleges in Israel. Findings of the study indicate that instructors have little preference for online teaching, noting the lack of personal, social, and emotional interactions with students and colleagues as one of the main shortcomings of online teaching. Only one third of participants preferred online teaching, and most instructors did not believe that online teaching offers an advantage in terms of the quality of teaching.

11:20  Responding to Uncertainty in Higher Education through the Spirit of  “Splace” and Flexible Learning

Krystle Ontong (University of Cape Town, South Africa)

Emergency Remote Teaching and “learning anywhere, anytime” rapidly became part of daily academic jargon once the pandemic began. However, in a South African context the application of these notions became somewhat more challenging, given the country’s history and socio-economic inequalities. Therefore, the South African government, adopted the term remote multimodal teaching and learning as a desensitized approach which acknowledges the diversity of students. The successful implementation of multimodal models relies on flexible pedagogies (FPs) to ensure that “no student is left behind.” However, FPs can only be effective after formulating a reconceptualization of the intersectionality between the places and spaces (‘splaces’) in which teaching and learning occurs.

Discussion

Break

12:50  Workshop 1:  Let’s Talk about Science

Alexandra Lehmann (Protestant University of Applied Sciences Rhineland-Westphalia-Lippe, Germany)
Martin Hirsch (University of Applied Sciences and Art Dortmund, Germany)

Did you ever ask yourself if maybe your definition of “science” differs from the definition your students have?! We did. So, we asked our students, and found out that whereas we as lecturers define “science” mainly as “questioning knowledge” and “testing ideas” while “using certain methods,” for our students “science” is mainly “empirical research”—which they don’t intend to pursue after they leave the university. The question therefore is whether we should actually teach an incomplete version of what science means to us. Moreover, how could we change students view of “science” in order to help them act in a more professional manner in their future jobs?

Break

14:05:  Roundtable 1:  The SIY Program Strengthens Self-Care and Emotional Health by Teaching Emotional Intelligence and Mindfulness Practices

Lee Christian Lesemann (University of Applied Sciences Darmstadt, Germany)

Our current pandemic lockdown situation creates strong emotional health challenges. Faculty members‘ and teams‘ emotional health, self-care, and mutual care are strengthened by the SIY (Search Inside Yourself) program, which teaches mindfulness and emotional intelligence based on Goleman’s framework. It combines knowledge from neuroscience and psychology research with established mindfulness practices. SIY has been taught to thousands of participants in organizations worldwide, receiving excellent feedback. In this workshop you will get to know SIY methods, understand scientific foundations, and engage in mindfulness practices and emotional learning experiences: (1) awareness & concentration; (2) self-compassion; (3) empathy, compassion, & kindness (4) resilience.

Papers 1 / Workshop 1 / Roundtable 1

Time: 10:00 UTC – 15:00 UTC

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Day One: Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Americas Focus 1
Time: 15:45 – 17:45 UTC

Opening Remarks / Keynote 3

Jim Wilkinson, President, IUT (Harvard University)

16:00  Keynote 3:  Trauma-Informed and Crisis Teaching: Using Empathy and Compassion in the Classroom

Matthew Winslow (Eastern Kentucky University, USA)

17:00-17:30  Keynote 3 Discussion

See the Recording

Day One: Wednesday, 21 July 2021

Americas Focus 2
Time: 18:00 – 21:30 UTC

Papers 2 / Roundtable 2 / Roundtable 3

Papers 2:  Supporting Remote Students:

Supporting Public School Intern Teachers in a Challenging COVID-19 Rural Distance Teaching Environment

Cliff Tyler (National University, USA)

The COVID-19 pandemic has had an enormous impact on every aspect of normal life, including K-12 and higher education students, teachers, and school communities. This paper will examine the impact on student/intern teachers and the research regarding the impact of isolation on remote learning and student achievement during this pandemic. It will also address the challenges encountered by teacher education professors supporting their public school student teachers and interns, and designing human side strategies to increase the academic achievement of their grades K-12 students in rural, lower socio-economic distance teaching and learning environments.

Transdisciplinary Undergraduate Learning Guides in the Humanities

Martha Brenckle, Patricia Farless & Amanda Snyder (University of Central Florida, USA)

Current learning outcomes emphasize critical thinking skills and life-long learning techniques. These skills remain a significant part of teaching in the Humanities and include student responsibilities to community and the importance of diversity and difference. Evidence suggests that active learning strategies can indeed lead to improved learning outcomes. However, to be effective, active learning strategies demand increased faculty involvement in student learning. This is not always possible when class size is large (100+) and especially when the class is entirely online. This presentation will show how introducing Learning Guides in online courses increased student learning.

Papers 2 Discussion

Roundtable 2:  Social and Emotional Learning: Strategies to Ensure a Supportive Online Learning Environment

Olga Hilas (St. John’s University, USA)

Over the past year, many educators in higher education have made the transition to remote instruction as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Professional development activities, online training programs, and institutional resources have focused on remote teaching and learning approaches to maximize educator effectiveness and student success. However, an emphasis on social and emotional learning (SEL) is also needed, due to the impact of the pandemic on mental health. This roundtable session will aim to introduce the process of SEL and strategies to enhance the development of healthy online learning environments by prioritizing emotional wellbeing, resilience and adaptability, and interpersonal relationships.

Roundtable 3:  Zoom On!  A Virtual Show & Share of Peer Student Stories for Connection and Support

HelenMarie Harmon (Indiana University Northwest, USA)

Every student—from entering, first-generation freshman to graduating, accomplished senior—has an intriguing, individual story to tell. While each student has a unique background, there is still an undeniable connectivity among the student population that unites them with one another. It’s from this bond that students experience a stronger sense of belonging—to their peers, campus, and academic pursuits. When students share their stories, there’s an abundance of peer support for success—especially needed during this current, unchartered pandemic. Online platforms allow the use of virtual technologies, further encouraging adaptability and creativity for the show and share.

See the recording

End of Day 1

Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Asia/Australia Focus 1
Time: 00:45 – 02:00 UTC

Announcements / Digital Showcase 1

00:45 UTC  Announcements

Digital Showcase 2: Responsive Blended Learning on an International Campus

 Xia Sheng Lee (Heriot-Watt University Malaysia, Malaysia)

The proposal is to showcase strategic implementations that support Heriot-Watt University’s ethos of Pioneering Education and Positive Education. Heriot-Watt University’s very own Responsive Blended Learning (RBL) combines active, supported online learning with contextually appropriate face-to-face learning opportunities, responding to the changing external context. This approach enables students to proceed with their studies alongside their peers regardless of specific pandemic-related contexts. EmPOWER, a program that encourages its students to hone their soft skills, is a well-structured program that is aimed at future-proofing graduates, unleashing their potential, and preparing them to have an impact in a highly uncertain world.

Break

Announcements / Digital Showcase 1

Time: 00:45 – 02:00 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Asia/Australia Focus 2
Time: 03:00 – 05:00 UTC

Papers 3 and Discussion

Papers 3:  Active / Engaged Learning In A Digital Environment

03:00  Reinventing Online Learning with Edutainment and Pathway to Peace (COVID Isolation Experience)

Shazia Naser-ud-Din (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

2020 will be long remembered for many reasons. One positive note is that online teaching and learning have been catapulted more than a decade ahead with enforced isolations across the globe. Social interactions are linked to wellbeing and mental health. We reinvented Oral Health Sector online teaching to energize the students and enhance participation primarily with two approaches. First, virtual synchronous online teaching of core subjects with element of Edutainment, and second, asynchronous “AHI Pathway to Peace” recording to be viewed on demand to alleviate stress and tension related to uncertainty. Overall, OHT program at CSU / Holmesglen endeavored to provide a unique learning experience despite the challenges of the pandemic.

03:20 Surprising Results from a Rapid Online Transition in Teaching a Difficult Pharmacology Subject

Louise Pemberton (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

A mid-semester rapid transition of a traditionally taught pharmacology subject to a virtual environment was performed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Lecture content was recorded and made available to students. Online tutorials containing discipline specific case studies were developed to cater to the needs of the four disciplines studying the subject. Adaptive learning resources were introduced to allow students to work through difficult pharmacological concepts at their own pace. Student feedback was overwhelmingly positive (95% positive responses in formal end of session surveys), with many reporting that the online mode was preferable and supported their learning in a flexible way that traditional lectures did not.

03:40 UTC  Learning Design and Vigotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development: Looking for the Sweet Spot

Sally McCarthy, Denise Wood & Greg Auhl (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

Lockdowns and social distancing highlight our reliance on interpersonal relationships and feelings of connectedness. From opera singing Italian balconies to Friday night Bin Gin get-togethers, we are finding new ways to connect. In the “online pivot,” teachers and students are also responding, repurposing the socially situated nature of learning. Teacher-student interactions remain key. Defined by Vygotsky (1934) as a More Knowledgeable Other, the teacher supports students achieving a degree of learning unattainable alone. Vygotsky defined the space where learning occurs the Zone of Proximal Development (ZDP). This paper explores three design models and their facilitation of the ZPD through teacher-student interactions in the online space.

04:00 UTC  E-learning and Assessment of Creative Modules in Design Education

Bela Gupta (Pearl Academy, India)

During the COVID-19 pandemic, academic institutions promptly shifted their educational activities to an e-learning format. This paper will highlight the methodology of teaching and assessment adopted by the School of Fashion at Pearl Academy in Delhi, India. Here I will discuss the challenges related to learning, attendance, and emotional fatigue, and the strategies adopted to overcome them. I will also discuss how setting up design studios at every student’s and faculty member’s home facilitated design learning during the COVID pandemic and suggest how further research could explore the impact of e-learning and assessment on the performance of students and teaching staff.

 

04:20 UTC  Papers 3 Discussion

Break

Papers 3 and Discussion

Time: 03:00 – 05:00 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 1
Time: 07:45 – 11:00 UTC

Announcements / Roundtable 4 / Papers 4 and Discussion

07:45 UTC  Announcements

Roundtable 4:  How (Not) to be Virtually Boring — Sharing the Experience

Lucie Viktorová (Pakacky University Olomouc, Czech Republic)

You are here, so you have probably looked into this already: How can we go about our teaching now that it’s online? How do we engage students? Some of the suggestions might be pretty obvious (and yet still missed by some people): 1) Seek out contact, don’t just assign homework; 2) Don’t simply talk for 90 minutes straight – promote interaction; 3) Obtain feedback and keep looking for ways to improve your teaching further. And right to this point, the current contribution aims to share the experience from online teaching – what to do in order (not) to be boring.

Break

9:00-10:50 UTC  Papers 4:  Active / Engaged Learning In A Virtual Environment:

09:00 UTC  Ethical Choices—Reliable Sources

Caren Weinberg (Ruppin Academic Enter, Israel)

Evaluating for credible, authoritative, reliable sources. This exercise “tricks” the students into understanding first-hand the importance of checking sources and their personal responsibility in ensuring the reliability of any sources. The exercise has two teams debating the university’s investment strategy for the Coca-Cola Company. The students are given a very long and completely biased background document with no explanation. They have traditionally read the entire document and based their debate prep 100% on the document without questioning it. Only after the debate is there a discussion on the source of the document and their reliance on it.

09:20 UTC  Health Technology Innovation Generation with Exponential Technologies

Michael Friebe (Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany)

New 5 ECTS interdisciplinary (students from Engineering, Natural Sciences, Medicine) lecture that provides attendees with much needed 21st-century skills to address future health challenges and innovation needs. The online lecture combines several innovative methodologies, including BIODESIGN and the PURPOSE LAUNCHPAD. Besides some individual assignments and the completion of external online programs (e.g. OpenExO methodology), the students were assigned to mixed teams with a goal of jointly identifying unmet clinical needs, analyzing underlying problems, creating possible solutions, and validating the problem/solution with the stakeholders. All that was done completely virtually this semester with excellent and better than expected results.

09:40 UTC  Wikipedia Editing as a Tool for Student Engagement

Sigal Tifferet (Ruppin Academic Center, Israel)

Wikipedia is an open digital encyclopedia that serves millions of users worldwide. In the past, its credibility was challenged; today, however, it is considered a credible source for information. Students read Wikipedia entries mainly to understand core concepts in their field of knowledge. In this paper, I will present how editing Wikipedia entries can help advance students’ information literacy. I will present the assignment, the learning process, and the products created by the students. I will also offer some recommendations to teachers wishing to implement this teaching method in their courses.

10:00 UTC  Closer at a Distance: Learning Design Strategies for Social Presence in Spatial Design Education

Jolanda Morkel & Hermie Delport (STADIO Higher Education, South Africa)

This paper explores learning design strategies for social presence in blended and online learning. The study is located at a large private Higher Education Institution in South Africa, focusing on the new School of Architecture and Spatial Design. Online surveys conducted with a team of curriculum designers and content creators, followed by a focus group interview with the core team, provide the data for this qualitative study. We argue that social presence can be achieved through purposeful learning design. Such a process must include careful consideration of the student persona, co-design strategies, and an iterative and reflective approach.

10:20 UTC  Papers 4 Discussion

Break

Announcements / Roundtable 4 / Papers 4 and Discussion

Time: 07:45 – 11:00 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 2
Time: 11:30 – 13:15 UTC

Roundtable 5 / Roundtable 6

Roundtable 5:  Engaged through Humor? Exploring Humor to Engage Students in Online Environments

Mark Curcher & Christopher Smith (Tampere University of Applied Sciences, Finland)

How can we connect with our students? The COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated and amplified the ongoing digitalization and datafication of higher education. Although there is an existing body of literature exploring effective implementation of online and distance education, many educators were thrust into a new reality where all communication with learners was mediated through the use of digital technologies. The aim of this session is to initiate an exploration of the uses of humor within a framework of critical digital pedagogy as a way of reaching through our cameras and screens to connect to our learners as fellow human beings.

12:15 UTC  Break

Roundtable 6:  The Crisis Will Pass, the Material Will Remain: How to Make the Most of It?

Birgit Pitscheider & Michael Habersam (University of Innsbruck, Austria)

Many instructors have been quite resourceful and productive during the COVID crisis and produced a vast amount of teaching material ranging from screencasts and videos to written instructions and audio material. Although it is certain that the individual instructor will make use of the material after the crisis, will we make our material available and more “sustainable” by giving a bigger audience access to it? What are the advantages and disadvantages of Open Educational Resources? What do we need to pay attention to when deciding whether to do so? These are some of the questions to be discussed at our roundtable.

Break

Roundtable 5 / Roundtable 6

Time: 11:30 – 13:15 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 3
Time: 15:00 – 16:00 UTC

Roundtable 7

Roundtable 7: Trust Me, I’m a Teacher! A Discussion of Trust in the Classroom

Janina Tosic (University of Applied Sciences Ruhr West, Germany)

The past year of teaching virtually has led me to believe strongly in the power of trust. This round table will focus on the value of trust as a driver in teaching. Why is trust important? What does it mean for us as teachers and for our students? Can we be trusting leaders on the one hand and approachable humans on the other? How is trust build and what destroys it? Story-telling components are used to illustrate these aspects and spur the discussion among participants. The idea is to give room for reflection and exchange to learn from each other.

15:45 UTC  Break

Roundtable 7

Time: 15:00 – 16:00 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Americas Focus 1
Time: 16:45 – 18:00 UTC

Announcements / Papers 5

16:45 Announcements

17:00-18:10 UTC  Papers 5: Active / Engaged Learning In A Virtual Environment:

17:00 UTC  Embracing e-Service Learning in the Age of COVID

Michelle Schmidt (Moravian College, USA)

As we transition to online methods of teaching and learning, we must continue service learning as a means of engaged and active learning, albeit in modified forms. This presentation will discuss forms of service learning and explore how the goals and meaning of service learning practices can be preserved despite different delivery techniques. Several examples of how traditional in-person service learning assignments were transformed into “electronic-service learning” for courses moved online will be shared. Assignments were in psychology classes but are easily adapted to other disciplines. Student feedback will highlight the advantages of e-service learning.

17:20 UTC  Community-Based Mathematics with Service Learning: Equipping Students for Lifelong Data Literacy

Julie Dierberger, Becky Brusky, & Michelle Friend (University of Nebraska Omaha, USA)

The University of Nebraska at Omaha has expanded general education math offerings in order to address high failure rates in college algebra. This presentation will describe the implementation of STAT 1100: Data Literacy and Visualization, which incorporates service learning into a course focused on data literacy. The course not only develops students’ quantitative literacy by focusing on critical workforce skills related to data literacy and visualization, but also incorporates service learning to ensure students are working with community partners on authentic projects and develops professional skills such as collaboration and critical thinking.

17:40 UTC  Papers 5 Discussion

18:10 UTC  Break

Announcements / Papers 5

Time: 16:45 – 18:00 UTC

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Day Two: Thursday, 22 July 2021

Americas Focus 2
Time: 19:00 – 21:00 UTC

Roundtable 8 / Roundtable 9

Roundtable 8:  Team-Based Learning: Benefits and Challenges in a Remote Learning Environment

Tina Caliendo (St. John’s University, USA)

In a post-COVID world, successfully incorporating innovative teaching practices that actively engage students in both face-to-face and remote learning environments has been challenging. Team-based learning (TBL) is one approach that can be used across various educational settings to improve the quality of online course content, improve educational outcomes, and prepare students to become life-long learners. In remote learning environments, students can collaborate synchronously or asynchronously by optimizing the use of technology and fostering effective team dynamics. Therefore, educators must be prepared to address common and unanticipated challenges that may emerge in order to encourage TBL strategies and promote student success.

19:45 UTC  Break

 

Roundtable 9: Re-Imagining Debate as a Challenge-Based Learning Activity

Katy Shorey (Northeastern University, USA)

This session is about re-imagining class debates. Why do class debates fail? Are they worth saving? This semester, my students and I are designing a series of class debates that promise to be surprisingly careful, educational, slow, and thoughtful. The assignments created to scaffold the debates are easy to implement across the disciplines and brings together a variety of active learning and challenge-based learning events. The audience will take away these assignment models, a model for how students design a debate activity, and evidence of the power of the class debrief.

17:40 UTC  Papers 5 Discussion

Roundtable 8 / Roundtable 9

Time: 19:00 – 21:00 UTC

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End of Day 2

Day Three: Friday, 23 July 2021

Asia/Australia Focus 1
Time: 00:45 – 02:00 UTC

Announcements / Roundtable 10

00:45 UTC  Announcements

Roundtable 10: Slowing Down to Speed Up: The Art and Science of Turning Off

Karen Hayes (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

Are you feeling tired? Constant technology access and pandemic induced working from home has blurred our work/home lives more than ever. The feeling of always working and always being available for others can lead to exhaustion, apathy, and stagnation, and definitely not to good teaching or general wellbeing. This session will explore the psychology and neuroscience of work, distraction, stress, and flow states. We will explore achievable ways to reduce our cognitive load by making technology, our brains, and workplaces work for us rather than against us, so we can do less to achieve more productivity, satisfaction, and most importantly rest.

01:45 UTC  Break

Announcements / Roundtable 10

Time: 00:45 – 02:00 UTC

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Day Three: Friday, 23 July 2021

Asia/Australia Focus 2
Time: 02:00 – 04:30 UTC

Papers 6 / Poster Discussion / Concluding Remarks

Papers 6:  Taking Care of Ourselves / Supporting Remote Students:

02:00 UTC  Navigating through a Perfect Storm: The Journey of a Survivor

George John (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

In a perfect storm where the unprecedented COViD-19 pandemic changed the way the world functions, compounded with the challenges of global financial instability, the higher education sectoral changes, and the pivot to an entirely online experience. How do we cope in such a fluid environment? This paper will outline the wellbeing impact of a teacher in delivering a virtual practical for a large health science subject and outline some of the strategies used in mitigating the situation and emerging from the journey battle-hardened.

02:20 UTC Teaching Remote Students in Medical Radiation Science during COVID-19.

Geoff Currie (Charles Sturt University, Australia)

The COVID-19 crisis forced rapid transition to online delivery, working at home, and students into a remote learning environment. While COVID-19 imposes potentially the greatest challenge many of us will experience in our personal and professional lifetimes, it also affords the opportunity to objectively re-evaluate and, where appropriate, re-design learning and teaching in higher education. For academic teaching in the medical radiation science (MRS) at Charles Sturt University, technology has allowed rapid assimilation to online learning environments with additional benefits that allows flexible, mobile, agile, sustainable, culturally safe, and equitable learning-focused educational environment in the post-COVID-19 “new normal”.

02:40 UTC  Evaluating the Transition to Emergency Online Teaching

Alexandra Mudd & Belinda Lange (Flinders University, Australia)

In 2020, in response to the COVID 19 pandemic, universities across the world made the transition to emergency online teaching. At a public university in South Australia, training was offered to staff on how to use the university’s preferred online platform. However, there was little time for staff to consider how to amend their teaching techniques to connect with students for effective learning. Meanwhile, students found themselves physically isolated from their peers, tutors, and university infrastructure. Our survey results explore the human experiences of students and teaching staff during this period of adaptation, focusing on what can be learnt for future.

Papers 6 Discussion

03:30 UTC  Break

Poster Discussion, Posters 2 & 5

Concluding Remarks

Jim Wilkinson (Harvard University, USA)

04:30 UTC  Break

Papers 6 / Poster Discussion / Concluding Remarks

Time: 02:00 – 04:30 UTC

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Day Three: Friday, 23 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 1
Time: 07:45 – 10:10 UTC

Announcements / Roundtable 11 / Papers 7

Announcements

Roundtable 11:  But What About the Day After Corona?

Avraham Roos (Herzog Academic College, Israel)

Teachers are slowly getting used to Zoom teaching, using digital tools to actively involve their students through distant learning. Whereas at the beginning, teachers were searching for digital tools to complement their usual lessons and facilitate distant teaching, by now many have found a comfortable way of using these tools and are beginning to see the advantages. Some have started asking themselves “how will I go back to regular teaching after this?” In this roundtable discussion, we will investigate the advantages gained from these tools and try to find techniques to copy these into our future face-to-face lessons.

08:45 UTC  Break

 

Papers 7:  Supporting Remote Students:

09:00 UTC  Developing Digital Teaching Competencies and Emotional Intelligence: Remote Training for Student Educators

Miriam Bär, Ann-Kathrin Feix, Dorothea Neudert, and Aperiya Nazina (University of Applied Sciences Darmstadt, Germany)

This paper presents the design of a course aimed at developing digital teaching competencies and emotional intelligence among student educators at a German university of applied sciences. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we were challenged to offer remote support to our team of student educators as they needed to transition to online teaching overnight. At the same time, the lockdown situation and life changes created significant emotional difficulty in dealing with the changes and uncertainty. We addressed these needs for new cognitive and emotional capabilities by offering a course based on (1) digital teaching competencies and (2) emotional intelligence.

09:20 UTC  Online Learning during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Student Challenges, Benefits, and Recommendations

Fadia Nasser-Abu Alhija (Tel Aviv University, Israel)

This study aimed to learn about students’ challenges due to online learning during the COVID-19 pandemic, the perceived benefits, and their recommendations for future learning. Data were collected from 150 students in different educational programs, different degrees, and different years of study. Students answered three open-ended questions regarding the challenges and benefits associated with online learning and their future learning recommendations. Findings indicate that students experienced social, technical, pedagogical, and personal challenges. Benefits most often cited related to convenience and savings of time and transport expenses, flexibility, and efficiency. Most students surveyed recommended applying a hybrid (face-to-face and online) teaching method.

Papers 7 Discussion

10:10 UTC Break

 

Announcements / Roundtable 11 / Papers 7

Time: 07:45 – 10:10 UTC

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Day Three: Friday, 23 July 2021

Europe/Middle East/Africa Focus 2
Time: 10:30 – 14:30 UTC

Poster Discussion / Papers 8 / Concluding Remarks

Poster Discussion: Posters 1, 3, 4, and 7

Posters 1, 3, 4, and 7

Papers 8:  Taking Care of Ourselves:

11:00 UTC What About Quality? Focusing on an Item Lost to COVID-19

Alexandra Lehmann (Protestant University of Applied Sciences Rhineland-Westphalia-Lippe, Germany)

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit our university world in spring 2020, the essential thing was to get our teaching settings working in the virtual world. Lectures had to be transferred to video overnight, meetings with students suddenly depended on stable internet connections, and how do you get a final thesis bonded with the copy shops closed? We all coped more or less well, and became semi-professional in technical support (or knew how to get it). It works, we function. Time to ask: How do we feel about this? Is this the sort of teaching we are content with?

11:20 UTC  University Teacher Self-Care: An Absolute Essential Within and Without a Global Pandemic

Helen Kwanashie (Ahmadu Bello University, Nigeria) & Michael Kwanashie (Veritas University, Nigeria)

Self-care is underrated globally and frequently misrepresented as selfish and unnecessary—more so for teachers for whom it is considered out-of-sync with the much revered concept of student-centered learning. However, routine teacher self-care reduces burnout, helping teachers better serve their students, especially within crisis situations like the ongoing covid-19 pandemic. Regardless of the quantity and quality of technological backups, the pandemic-associated remote and/or hybrid learning modalities with attendant extra stressors, accentuate the need for university teacher self-care practices. Drawing from the literature, the authors will offer a generic toolkit that university teachers may deploy in developing individualized self-care plans.

Papers 8 Discussion

12:10 UTC  Break

Roundtable 12:  Help the Teachers First, Then They Can Help the Students

Meir Komar (Jerusalem College of Technology, Israel)

The main objective of this roundtable discussion is to hear from the participants concerning best practices as well as interventions that did not work in supporting social and emotional issues of higher education faculty during these unique times. How do we give faculty that much-needed emotional support? How do we support/maintain social networking among academic and non-academic staff? How do we encourage and develop peer-support? We will try to evaluate these interventions using the framework of Social Emotional Learning.

Roundtable 13:  Overcoming the Online Challenge

Eleni Stavrou (University of Cyprus, Cyprus)

This session provides practical insights into innovative teaching practices, which bridge the gap between theory and practice through the presentation of various tasks and strategies designed to re-motivate and re-engage the ESL learner within online and/or face to face contexts. The session will focus on pedagogies that embrace real-world English language resources such as popular song and other forms of entertainment media as learning prompts to enhance the attainment of course objectives in EAP (English for Academic Purposes) courses. Using real world sources impacts learner engagement and motivation and offers a chance for students to enrich their learning experiences.

Concluding Remarks

Jim Wilkinson (Harvard University, USA)

14:30 UTC  Break

Poster Discussion / Papers 8 / Concluding Remarks

Time: 10:30 – 14:30 UTC

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Day Three: Friday, 23 July 2021

Americas Focus 1
Time: 15:45 – 19:45 UTC

Announcements / Roundtable 14 / Papers 9 / Poster Discussion / Roundtable 15 / Concluding Remarks

Announcements

Roundtable 14: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning as a Work of Heart

Andrea Webb & Analise Hofmann (University of British Columbia, Canada) and Heather Lewis (Pratt Institute, USA)

Brokers connect with a network, either by reaching in or by extending out, in order to gather interested people and push projects on teaching and learning forward. In this roundtable presentation, our community of scholars will share how we have, through work on a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) writing group, created a community that has continued to work together on scholarly pursuits, as well as supporting each other personally. While we have continued to engage with the intellectual side of SoTL, our work in SoTL has also become a work of heart.

16:45 UTC  Break

Papers 9:  Taking Care Of Ourselves And Responding To Uncertainty With Flexibility:

17:00 UTC Teaching with Our Hearts and Heads

Anne Tierney (Heriot-Watt University, UK)

Becoming a teacher in higher education is a developmental and transformative process. Many institutions are improving in the support they give to new academic staff, in the form of postgraduate certificates in higher education and universities often now have a “teaching and scholarship” career track. There is still a challenge to supporting the development of scholarly approaches to teaching in higher education subsequent to the initial postgraduate qualification. This paper seeks to explore and discuss the options that are open to staff at different stages in their careers, and how we can encourage scholarly approaches to teaching and learning.

17:20 UTC  Pandemic Piano Teaching: How Losing a Sense of Touch Changed Us as Human Beings

Hedi Salanki-Rubardt and Blake Riley (University of West Florida, USA)

In March of 2020, the pandemic forced educators into remote teaching. This was particularly difficult in the field of music because we rely on expression and physical touch. Somehow, we were able to finish the spring semester by having all playing exams submitted on video. We quickly realized the hardships facing our students and realized it was our opportunity to grow as human beings and offer empathy. In the fall, we returned to face-to-face teaching but our efforts were encumbered by COVID-19 protocols. This paper will explore the uncertainties of teaching both remotely and face-to-face in the time of COVID-19.

 

Paper 9 Discussion

18:10 UTC Break

Poster Discussion, Poster 6

Roundtable 15:  A Menu of Delights in Pandemic Portions: Virtual Resources for Teaching in the COVID Era

Michael Lenaghan (Miami Dade College, USA)

During the pandemonic pandemic, responding to uncertainty with flexibility became a gift not a curse within a structured, flexible, experimental context with access to more resources than imaginable in a normal year. Four internal and six external, freely accessible resources provided a cupboard of delicious elements with which a menu of delights were generated, infused, widely used, and generated better than “normal” scholar outcomes.  We will explore them here.

Concluding Remarks

Jim Wilkinson (Harvard University, USA)

 

Announcements / Roundtable 14 / Papers 9 / Poster Discussion / Roundtable 15 / Concluding Remarks

Time: 15:45 – 19:45 UTC

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End of Day 3

Thank you!

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